Gun Fighter Double Cask Review

Whiskey Name: Gun Fighter Double Cask Bourbon

Distillery: Golden Moon (bourbon is sourced, then recasked at Golden Moon)

Whiskey Type: Bourbon finished in “French Port Barrels”

Release Date: Released in 2015, now generally available

Price: £42

Age: “Minimum 6 months in new American oak and then finished in used French Port”

ABV: 50%

Mashbill: Undisclosed. Presumably rye-recipe

Introduction/Background: I hadn’t even heard of this one previously, so was very intrigued when I came across it on Master of Malt. Finished bourbon is growing and growing at the moment; as are the battle-lines of those who stand for and against it. An article for another time; if we got too deeply into it here then we’d never make it to the review.

The cask finish for this one is a puzzler. Golden Moon distillery in Colorado have it on their website as “French Port Barrels”. As a wine man that raises my hackles a little; the same way it’d annoy most people reading this if Scotland were to label one of their whiskies as “bourbon”. (Though I’m not sure why they would…)

Master of Malt tread the Protected Designation of Origin lines more carefully, describing the casks as having held “French fortified wine.” Which would presumably point to something like a Maury or a Banyuls. But the plot thickens when you take to the distillery’s Facebook page. There they say that the casks are “French Oak Port Barrels”. Which leads perfectly legally back towards Portugal. (Though more cask-fussy readers might question whether they were indeed “barrels”, or the more usual Port pipes.)

If nothing else, finished bourbon clearly makes life more complicated then. Though perhaps only for pedants and nerds like me with too much time to over-ponder. Shall we get cracking?

Appearance: A glimmer of pink betrays the finish…

Nose: Yowza! Well there’s the fortified wine, straight away. So prominently that it caused me to write the word “yowza!” for the first time in my life. (And last – I don’t think it suits me.) All kinds of dried fruit clamouring to get out of the glass. A trace of fresher berries too, plus a zing of fresh pine stopping things from getting cloying. This really is all about those finishing casks; no way you’d peg this as a bourbon were you to sniff it blind. There’s also a touch of struck match sulphur too; familiar to wine-finished scotch drinkers, but a first for me where bourbon’s concerned.

Mouth: Palate is very juicy, ripe and rounded; almost chewy. Again it’s the wine finish that dominates; raisins, prunes etc. A little marzipan and candied nut too, beside a certain smokiness; real Yuletide whiskey. Alcohol is fully balanced by flavour and weight of body; there’s no major burn.

Finish: The fruit fades; that touch of struck match lingers a little longer. Medium length.

Value for Money: Depends entirely on whether you like this sort of thing.

Summary: I know a lot of people who would dismiss this whiskey’s right to be called a bourbon. Personally I’m still not sure which side of the fence I sit on. Certainly the flavours are a long, long way from those you’d expect. This is about the cask finish to a far greater degree than any finished bourbon I’ve previously sampled. If you’re a fan of ex-fortified wine matured scotch, for example, this is very much a whiskey for you, and worth the £42 price tag. If you’re a bourbon purist however, this may not be quite your cup of Darjeeling.

Overall Verdict: Perhaps it’s best to just put the finishing debate aside and gauge this on the merit of flavour alone. On which basis I very much enjoyed Gun Fighter Double Cask. Rogue smear of sulphur aside it’s full of fun, festive flavour. Well worth trying if you’re a scotch drinker … and a cert if you’re looking to hoodwink someone in a blind tasting.

Word by WhiskyPilgrim