1792 Small Batch Review

Whiskey Name: 1792 Small Batch

Distillery: Barton 1792

Whiskey Type: Kentucky Straight Bourbon

Release Date: General release

Price: About £45 (Shopping around can bring that down slightly…)

Age: NAS (about 8 years)

ABV: 46.85%

Mashbill: Rye recipe. Rumoured to be about 75% corn, 15% rye, 10% malted barley

Introduction/Background: Barton has the feel of being Sazerac’s “other” distillery, and totally fine with that. Whilst Buffalo Trace flourishes ritzy releases and racks up the column inches, Barton quietly gets on with distilling classic Kentucky bourbon like Old Barton and 1792.

Named for the year that Kentucky was recognised as a state, 1792 originally came with the suffix “Ridgemont Reserve”, until Brown-Forman slapped them with a lawsuit, saying customers would confuse it with their brand. You can see their point: who amongst us hasn’t tried to type “Woodford” on their phone, only to see it autocorrected to “Ridgemont”…?

BBS did a 1792 tasting a few weeks back, but thanks to the inadequacies of British Rail I missed out. Being rather fond of the brand I was considerably miffed, so I made sure it was in the lineup of samples for this month.

Appearance: Fairly deep amber

Nose: After a couple of days of rather unorthodox bourbons, this has a sort of “and you’re back in the room” feel. Like a playlist of “rye-recipe Kentucky bourbon’s greatest hits”. Lots of caramel, vanilla and honey, all supported by that crackle of spicy, woody rye and oak. Actually, if this is 15% rye then that 15% is working very hard; no hiding it whatsoever. Aromas seem to cruise out of the glass; don’t need a big sniff, but also not bellowing up your nostrils.

Mouth: Well-proportioned and oily. Caramels and brown sugars rather ooze across the palate, whilst the rye cracks its whip to keep things balanced and spicy. Almost a salted butter kind of thing going on. The longer it’s in your mouth, the more influence the rye seems to have, though it never becomes over the top.

Finish: The woodiness of cask and rye fade away unhurriedly.

Value for Money: Well worth it.

Summary: I loved this when I first tasted it, and I still love it now. It’s what bourbon in this sort of age and price category is all about, and manages to be so without being shouty or showy. Nothing wildly idiosyncratic perhaps; just good, classic bourbon done well.

Overall Verdict: Probably in my top five bourbons for under £50. Sure, it sings from a well-worn hymn sheet, but I’d happily listen to it do so any time. 

Words by WhiskyPilgrim